Things to do nearby Jenkinson Place

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Jenkinson Place is located off the wonderfully named Fangs Brow, above the head of Loweswater. This secluded part of the west Lake District is a unique and special retreat.

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Loweswater has a close affinity with Crummock Water and Buttermere whilst maintaining its own unique identity. The area is a stronghold for red squirrels – they are a common sight scampering alongside the lake and in the woodlands around the lake.

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At the head of the lake, the Kirkstile Inn has been providing nourishment to weary travellers for over 400 years.  Today the Kirkstile maintains its reputation for unpretentious, home-cooked meals, placing great emphasis on local Cumbrian and Lake District suppliers.

The beer garden must be one of the best in the region. It looks out onto Mellbreak and serves a fine pint of the mountain’s namesake beer, brewed in the onsite microbrewery.

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Loweswater is an Old Norse name for ‘leafy lake’, a very apt description in particular on the south western shore where Holme Wood is a dense forest, home to red squirrels and the hidden Holme Force waterfall.

Jenkinson Place is just off the Coast to Coast cycle route. The Loweswater area is well suited to cyclists as the lanes are quiet and undulating. Mockerkin is just over the brow of the hill, part of a gentle loop suitable for children too. The tarn is a riot of colour through the summer with beautiful yellow and white waterlilies. The tarn is said to be the ancestral seat of an ancient Celtic King!

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Along with Crummock Water and Buttermere, Loweswater was once part of a large glacial lake. Evidence of this remains in the low lying ground that now separates them. They still share a great sense of familiarity, being owned and protected by the National Trust, and are much less visited than most areas of the Lake District. You can read more in our guide to Buttermere and Crummock.

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From Buttermere you can drive over Honister Pass which takes you into the Borrowdale Valley and Keswick beyond.  Honister has a slate mine and can also take you climbing on their via ferrata tours and well named Bridge of Infinity!

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Keswick is famed for its stunning mountain scenery, beautiful Derwentwater, and the friendly pedestrianised town centre. If you are looking to upgrade your walking boots then Keswick is the place to go. There are 14 outdoor equipment shops! There is also a theatre, cafes, pubs and restaurants.  You can hire boats or take the launch around the lake. You can read more in our Keswick Area Guide.

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Cockermouth is your nearest town (15 minutes) and has some of the best shopping in Cumbria, with a wealth of independent and antique shops along the main street. It is one of the closest locations for a main supermarket; there is a Sainsbury’s, an excellent butcher, deli, fishmonger and two bakeries. The town has a strong Georgian heritage and is the birthplace of William Wordsworth, the Lakeland poet. His home in the town is now a museum.  Read more in our Cockermouth Area Guide.

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In the opposite direction lies the Ennerdale Valley, one of the Lake District's wildest valleys. Its remote location makes it the perfect place to escape to even in high season. Here, you will still see more sheep than people.  The lake has the distinction of being the only lake in the Lake District without a tarmac road running alongside and long may that continue.

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Walking is the big draw here with Pillar, Steeple, High Stile, Great Borne and Red Pike being rewarding days out in the fells.  You can also walk right round the lake at Ennerdale which has an obvious path and is easy to follow (although narrow in places).

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The Wasdale Valley (20 miles) is similarly remote as Ennerdale and is prime walking country with the big fells of Great Gable, Scafell and Scafell Pike. The valley boasts England’s deepest lake, tallest mountain, smallest church and biggest liar.  You can read more in our Wasdale Area Guide.

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Beyond Wasdale is Eskdale, home to the the Ravenglass and Eskdale miniature steam railway which takes you seven miles from Eskdale to Ravenglass, the only coastal village to be within a National Park.  If you visit Eskdale for the day, a walk to Stanley Ghyll Waterfall from St Catherine’s Church is also well worth a visit, as well as an amble through the Japanese Gardens at Giggle Alley! You can find out more in our Eskdale Area Guide.

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