Things to do nearby Goosegreen Barn

Image

Nearby is the pretty seaside village of St Bees in West Cumbria. St. Bees has a delightful beach with breathtaking views toward the Isle of Man and is the only heritage coastline between Wales and Scotland to feature an RSBP bird reserve. St. Bees is the start of Wainwright’s famous coast to coast walk (and cycle route) so you can expect to see many eager walkers and cyclists dipping their boots and back wheels in the sea as they set off.

Image

The mile-long sandy beach at St Bees is one of the most popular family destinations along the western coast. It is popular with water sports enthusiasts. For those who like to try the more adventurous things in life, the coastline between Whitehaven and St Bees offers plenty of opportunities.The wide expanses and easy access to St Bees beach have resulted in it becoming increasingly popular with kite buggy enthusiasts and kite surfers. Those that prefer to just fly kites rather than use them as a means of transport will find that there are a number of excellent sites on the coast, free of overhead cables and with sea breezes virtually guaranteed.
 

Image

For those with their own boat, sea and surf kayaking are a great way of getting on the water. For those who prefer to be on land, St. Bees golf course offers a challenging round overlooking the beach. Rock climbing and bouldering are possible to the north, or you can enjoy Cumbria’s coastal cliff walk from St Bees to Whitehaven.
 

Image

The restored historic harbour at Whitehaven now houses a thriving marina and a traditional Georgian town.
 

Image

It is a popular area for paragliders and hang gliders due to the board flat plateaus and cliff slopes. You will see them launch themselves into the air flying along the coast.
Hadrian’s cycle way passes thorugh St Bees, from Ravenglass on it’s way to South Shields. The route is 174 miles long and sign posted throughout.
 

Image

Just along the road at Egremont, Florence Mine was the last working iron ore mine in Europe until it closed in 2008. In it’s hey day it was an industrious iron ore mine. What used to the shower block is now the Florence Mine Centre for Arts. It houses an art gallery, exhibition space and workshops areas. There is also a multifunctional studio where you may be able to catch a film, come to an open mike night, attend a sports class or come to watch shows and plays.

Rosehill Theatre, on the hills above Whitehaven,is one of the UK's most intimate theatres offering a diverse range of arts and entertainment from music, theatre, talks, comedy, shows for young people and more. It has a free car park, a licensed bar and provide great food and drink. From the theatre, there are stunning views over the Solway Firth to Scotland and inland to the Lake District. A truly exceptional setting.
 

Image

The newly refurbished Beacon in Whitehaven offers an interactive experience for all the family. Absorb yourself in the amazing views through the powerful telescopes in the Viewing Gallery, present your very own weather forecast in the Weather Zone and explore the lighthouse style building to discover local history through the ages using interactive touchscreens, sights, sounds, and smells. Dig up your very own Roman artefact or join the crew and jump aboard the Maria Lowther Ship. From pirates, police, and the lives of the rich and poor – to games, ghosts, disease and death!

Whitehaven is a Georgian town situated in The Western Lake District and is one of the first pre-planned post medieval towns in the country. Built on shipping and mining, Whitehaven is one of the 40 Gem Towns in England. The development of Whitehaven owes much to the Lowther family, it was Sir John Lowther, inspired by Christopher Wren's designs for rebuilding London after the Great Fire of 1666, who laid out the original grid system of streets and specified the type of houses to be built.

The port development was linked to the exploitation of rich local deposits of coal and iron ore. Some coal mines extended for several miles beneath the sea bed. Whitehaven was the last mainland place in Britain to be attacked by American naval forces. On 23rd April 1778 during the American War of Independence, John Paul Jones arrived in Britain with the intention of setting the whole merchant fleet on fire. The alarm was raised, and he retreated forthwith. Another American link is that Mildred Warner Gale, the grandmother of the American president George Washington, lived in Whitehaven. She was buried in the grounds of St Nicholas' Church, on 30th January 1700/1. Visitors may climb a narrow spiral stair in the Clock Tower, to see the workings of the clock, and to see a small display relating to the Gale family.

Whitehaven has over 250, mostly Georgian, Listed Buildings, many tastefully restored, including St James' Church, once described by Sir Nikolaus Pevsner as 'the finest Georgian church interior in the county'.

Image

Whitehaven is the starting point of the popular 140 mile long C2C Cycle Route. The cycle route travels along the Whitehaven to Ennerdale Cycle path, through the scenic delights of the Lake District and on over the roof of England to the remote North Pennines before reaching the north east coast.

The Rum Story – the Dark Spirit of Whitehaven, is set in the original shop, courtyards, cellars and bonded warehouses of the Jefferson family business, in the Georgian town of Whitehaven. Here you can find out about the story of the UK rum trade, which originally centered on the port of Whitehaven. The journey starts in the Caribbean rainforest and graphically depicts the story of rum, bringing to life the slave trade, American prohibition, rum in the Royal Navy, rum in history, the process of rum making and more. The Courtyard Cafe is open to everyone whether you are visiting the exhibition or just fancy a morning coffee or afternoon tea. Within the courtyard is the amazing ‘Kinetic Clock’, which, every half-hour, graphically depicts the way rum is made – from the harvesting of sugar cane to the bottling of the rum.

Image

Ennerdale, Wasdale Head, Eskdale are all areas of outstanding beauty in the Lake District National Park. Wastwater is England's deepest lake and is situated at Wasdale Head at the bottom of England's tallest mountain, Scafell Pike.  One not to be missed.

Find a cottage

Newsletter Signup