Things to do nearby Damson Cottage (Waberthwaite)

Image

Scafell Pike

A spectacular 20-mile drive takes you along the dramatic shoreline of Wast Water to the Wasdale Head and the start of one of the known walking paths up Scafell Pike. The route takes you via Broad Stand and Mickledore, returning via the Corridor Route and is approximately six and a half miles. Park at Wasdale Head car park and follow the footpath towards Lingmell Beck. A southwards climb takes you diagonally up the hillside to reach the main path up Lingmell Gill. The gill will be alongside you for just over a kilometre when it splits at Hollow Stones. From there, the trail climbs steeply until the plateau and then it is only a short but careful walk over the bouldery landscape to the summit. When you reach the cairn you know you've made it and can relax to take in the rewarding views.

Image

Ravenglass

With a natural harbour that looks to be taken straight from a picture book, the delightful Roman fishing village of Ravenglass is the only coastal village in the Lake District National Park. Located on the estuary of three rivers, Mite, Irt and Esk, the village and surrounding countryside is a lovely destination for a relaxing amble. Ravenglass was an important Roman naval base over two thousand years ago and the remains of the Roman Bathhouse, once part of the Roman Fort which defended the port, can still be visited today. The village has a few pubs offering good food, and a great place to take in the extraordinary views.

Image

Muncaster Castle

Muncaster Castle is only a 10-minute drive from Waberthwaite and is well worth a visit. It has been home to the Pennington family since 1208 and is steeped in history offering a tour filled with compelling stories and fascinating artefacts. The grounds surrounding the castle are certainly worthy of exploration and, regardless of the time of year you visit, you are sure to be amazed by what you find. The calendar is packed full of events that cater for all interests, and the Hawk and Owl Centre offers bird displays almost all year round. There are also two eateries serving all manner of goodies from Cumbrian breakfasts and homecooked meals to delicious cakes and light refreshments.

Image

Ravenglass and Eskdale Steam Railway

The La'al Ratty, as it is affectionately known, is one of the longest and oldest narrow gauge railways in England. Ravenglass and La'al Ratty is only a 10 minute drive away from the cottage. Departing from the pretty coastal village of Ravenglass, the steam-powered engines transport passengers back in time as they enjoy the spectacular scenery of this 7-mile journey. Travelling from the estuary, through beautiful woodlands, passed numerous optional stops, the ride ends at Boot Station in the Eskdale Valley. Walking trails can be picked up from the various stops along the way, and it is always worth checking the calendar of events which are on offer in addition to their regular timetable.

Image

Cumbrian Coast Line

A fabulous way to explore Cumbria's coast is by jumping on a train at Bootle station bound for either Barrow-in-Furness in the south, or Carlisle in the north. The 82-mile journey makes many stops along the way, offering the perfect opportunity for sightseeing. Visit the attractive seaside towns of Maryport and Whitehaven, enjoy a windswept walk up St Bees Head or along Silecroft beach, take in a bit of history and explore the Roman connection at Carlisle's Tullie House Museum, or just sit back and enjoy the spectacular scenery of the Lakeland Fells and the Irish Sea. You'll also see plenty of evidence of Cumbria's energy developments as you pass by wind turbines, gas platforms, and of course the controversial site that is Sellafield.

Image

Whitehaven

The Georgian coastal town of Whitehaven is built around its impressive historical harbour, once an important port for exporting salt and coal and by the 18th century a bustling centre for importing the likes of tobacco, sugar, spices and spirits. The Rum Story is a museum in the heart of Whitehaven, which transports visitors back in time and to exotic places as it retells the history of rum and its importance in Whitehaven's heritage. The Beacon is another fine visitor attraction in the town where a diverse range of excellent interactive displays on the area's past and geography are complemented by a calendar of temporary exhibits to provide an enjoyable day out.

Image

Coniston

Less than an hour's drive from Waberthwaite is the delightful Lakeland village of Coniston and the picturesque Coniston Water. Though only small in size, Consiton packs the punches when it comes to admirers, with authors Arthur Ransom and Beatrix Potter, and poet and artist John Ruskin all declaring their love for the place and calling it home for parts of their life. It has played its role in history too, remembered as the water where Sir Donald Campbell broke the water speed record in 1955, and where he died trying to regain it again some twelve years later. For many, there is no more civilised way to experience the Lake District than a walk along the shoreline, a cruise on the steam yacht gondola or an afternoon tea in one of its delightful tearooms and cafes.

Image

Image

Eskdale Golf Course
Few golf courses can boast being set in such majestic scenery as Eskdale Golf Course. It is a combination of the stunning views and challenging golf that brings golfers back year after year to play on this 18 hole course. If fishing is more your thing, however, the private fishing area on the beautiful River Esk is definitely for you. A tranquil setting to enjoy an afternoon catching sea trout, brown trout and Salmon from the several pools.Day permits for fishing on the Rivers Esk and Irt can be obtained through Millom and District Angling Association online.

Image

Image

Cycling

Cycling opportunities are limitless in the Lake District, and Waberthwaite is as great a place as any to make a base. For mountain biking, centres in Grizedale Forest and Whinlatter Forest offer plenty of choice of trails for different abilities and are both approximately an hour's drive from the property. If road biking is more your thing, the Hadrian's Cycleway starts close to Ravenglass and takes you all the way up the coast to Carlisle before it leaves the county to head east. The Cumbrian Coast Line railway makes it possible to ride the journey one-way, taking in all the sites as you go, and then simply hop on the train back.

Image

Buttermere

The walking opportunities in the Buttermere valley are immense. The 4.5-mile circular lakeshore walk is popular with families as it is relatively easy and offers spectacular views the whole way around. The Buttermere to Rannerdale walk is a stunning walk along a Lakeland ridge, climbing up from Buttermere to the summit of Rannerdale Knotts. But probably one of the best-known fells in the Lake District is Haystacks, which rose to fame due to the adoration pledged to it by Alfred Wainwright. While not of any great elevation, walkers flock to it every year and enjoy the handsome rock formations and pretty tarns on its summit.

Find a cottage

Newsletter Signup